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Vaccine Appointments - Open to General Public Ages 16+

Click here to register for an appointment in Larimer County

If no appointments are available, please check back soon. If you need assistance signing up, call the Health Department Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30 at 970-498-5500. Colorado is currently vaccinating anyone who would like a COVID-19 vaccine that is 16 years old and above. Note that 16-17-year-olds can only receive the Pfizer vaccine at this time. 

Pfizer Vaccines for Individuals Ages 12-15

On May 10th, the FDA expanded the authorization for the use of the Pfizer COVID vaccine to individuals who are ages 12-15. Before the vaccine can be provided to this new age group, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) must make a formal recommendation for providers to use the vaccine in this age group. ACIP will meet on Wednesday, May 12th, to discuss this and make decisions around a formal recommendation. Once all of the appropriate approvals and recommendations are in place, vaccine providers will be able to start offering appointments for those in this age group. To be notified when Pfizer appointments are available for this new age group, please complete this form.

Vaccine appointments and walk-in appointments with the health department and the State Community Vaccination site at the Ranch, operated by Nomi Health, are available throughout the week. Click here to find an appointmentIndividuals over age 16 are eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Colorado. If no appointments are available, check back another time. If you need assistance signing up, call the Health Department Monday-Friday, 9:00-4:30 at 970-498-5500.
 

Individuals who are 16 and 17 are currently eligible to receive the Pfizer COVID vaccine and must have parent or guardian consent to be vaccinated. Teens registered ahead of time for an appointment may arrive without a parent or guardian present to be vaccinated. Walk-in appointments for teens require a parent or guardian to be present to provide consent to be vaccinated.

LCDHE COVID Vaccine Clinics

Appointments are strongly recommended to guarantee that you will be able to be vaccinated and to reduce the time needed for your vaccine visit. Walk-ins available on a limited basis based on availability.
Upcoming Clinics: (Schedule subject to change)
 
Date Vaccine Time Location
Thursday, May 13th Moderna 1-5pm Northside Aztlan Center, 112 E Willow Dr, Fort Collins
Saturday, May 15th Moderna 9am-5pm Moby Arena, 951 W Plum St, Fort Collins
Monday, May 17th Moderna 9am-5pm Moby Arena, 951 W Plum St, Fort Collins
Tuesday, May 18th Moderna 1-5pm Foundations Church, 1380 N Denver Ave, Loveland
Thursday, May 20th Moderna 1-5pm Northside Aztlan Center, 112 E Willow Dr, Fort Collins
Saturday, May 22nd Moderna 9am-5pm Moby Arena, 951 W Plum St, Fort Collins

State Community Vaccine Clinic at The Ranch

Appointments are strongly recommended to guarantee that you will be able to be vaccinated and to reduce the time needed for your vaccine visit. Walk-ins available on a limited basis based on availability.

  • Monday-Saturday, 10am-5:30pm-5280 Arena Cir, Loveland
    • Appointments (preferred) and walk-ins available
  • Week of 5/10: Pfizer and J&J are available for appointments and walk-ins. 
    • Pfizer will be available soon for individuals ages 12-15, pending ACIP recommendation. Please complete this form to be notified when appointments are available for this age group.

Want to be contacted when vaccine appointments are available?

If you would like to register yourself or your employees to be contacted when appointments are available, use the forms below.
  • Larimer County businesses who would like to help coordinate vaccines for their employees and be contacted when appointments are available, please submit this form.
  • Individuals who would like to be contacted when vaccine appointments are available, please submit this form. 
  • If you no longer need an appointment and wish to be removed from the Health Department's vaccine appointment notification list, please submit this form

Larimer County COVID-19 Vaccine Providers

Vaccines are given by appointment only.

UCHealth
Information about UCHealth’s vaccine distribution plan is available on its website at uchealth.org/covidvaccine. This site includes information to help people sign up and be included in the vaccine distribution, even if they are not current UCHealth patients.
A random selection process will send invitations to schedule a vaccine appointment when one is available. If you or a loved one does not have access or skill with using the online portal, please call UCHealth at 720-462-2255 to be added to their notification list. 
Banner Health Please take the survey to determine if you are eligible to receive the vaccine. Appointments will need to be scheduled online.
Kaiser Permanente
Members can visit Kaiser Permanente’s vaccine page and click "Sign up for a vaccine".
Upon providing your information to them, you will be placed on a first-come, first-served waitlist for the vaccine based on your eligibility.
Salud Family Health Please check Salud's website for updates.
Sunrise Community Health Please check Sunrise's website for updates.
Safeway Pharmacy Some Larimer County Safeway pharmacy locations have appointments available.
If eligible, appointments can be made here; if none are available, check back at another time. 
King Soopers Pharmacy Some Larimer County King Soopers pharmacy locations have appointments available.
If eligible, appointments can be made here; if none are available, check back at another time. 
Walmart Pharmacy Some locations in Colorado are offering COVID-19 vaccines and have appointments available.
If eligible, appointments can be made here; if none are available, check back at another time. 
Transportation to and from your vaccine appointment is available. Please contact the provider you will be seeing for your vaccine appointment to connect with available transportation services.

Vaccine Distribution Phases

As of April 2, all Coloradans ages 16+ who would like to be vaccinated are eligible. To be as fair and efficient with distribution as possible, the state developed a phased approach to vaccine distribution to save lives and end the crisis that has been brought on by the pandemic as quickly as possible. By vaccinating people who are most likely to get COVID-19 first, we can keep more Coloradans safe.

See how many people in Larimer County have been vaccinated so far (click the Vaccine tab)

Larimer and Weld County Vaccine Equity Plan Summary

Please note: As we move through phases, people in previous phases remain eligible. Timeline subject to change based on supply chain. Prioritization subject to change based on data, science, availability.
PHASES               ELIGIBILITY 
Phase 1A
current

Highest-risk health care workers and individuals:

  • People who have direct contact with COVID-19 patients for 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period. 
  • Long-term care facility staff and residents.
Phase 1B.1
current

Coloradans age 70+, moderate-risk health care workers, and first responders:

  • Health care workers with less direct contact with COVID-19 patients (e.g. home health, hospice, pharmacy, dental, etc.) and EMS.
  • Firefighters, police,  COVID-19 response personnel, correctional workers, and funeral services.
  • People age 70 and older.
Phase 1B.2
current

Coloradans age 65-69, PK-12 educators and child care workers in licensed child care programs, and state government:

  • Child care workers in licensed child care programs, teachers (full-time and substitutes), bus, food, counselors, administrative, safety, and other support services offered inside the school.
  • Members of the executive and judicial branches of state government (members of the legislative branch have already received access to the vaccine).
  • People age 65-69.

Phase 1B.3
current

 

Individuals who are eligible in this phase based on age or health conditions may complete this form to be added to our vaccine notification list.

 

Agencies and employers of individuals who are eligible based on their employment may complete this form to be connected to a vaccine provider once this phase starts and doses are available.

People age 60 and older, frontline essential agricultural and grocery store workers, and people age 16-59 with two or more high-risk conditions:

  • People age 60 and older.

  • Frontline essential workers in grocery and agriculture: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current workers who cannot maintain physical distance from others at their place of employment, who work in close contact with many people, especially indoors, and in places with poor ventilation including meatpacking workers; grocery store workers; and agricultural processing workers.

  • People age 16-59 with two or more of the following:

    • Cancer (defined as patients who are currently receiving treatment or have received treatment within the last month for cancer),
    • chronic kidney disease, COPD, diabetes mellitus (types 1 and 2), Down syndrome,
    • specific heart conditions (heart failure, cardiomyopathies or coronary heart disease, and severe valvular/congenital heart disease),
    • obesity (BMI of 30 or more),
    • pregnancy, sickle cell disease, solid organ transplant, individuals with disabilities who require direct care in their home,
    • and people with disabilities that prevent them from wearing masks.
Phase 1B.4
current

 

Individuals who are eligible in this phase based on age or health conditions may complete this form to be added to our vaccine notification list.

 

Agencies and employers of individuals who are eligible based on their employment may complete this form to be connected to a vaccine provider once this phase starts and doses are available.

People age 50 and older, frontline essential workers, people with high-risk conditions, and the continuation of operations for state government and continuity of local government:
  • People age 50 and older.

  • Frontline essential workers in the following fields:

    • Higher education: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current educators who work in close contact with many people especially indoors, including all student-facing staff in community colleges and colleges. Student-facing staff includes instructors, professors, vocational educators and staff providing safety and other support services offered inside the school.

    • Frontline essential workers in food/restaurant services: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current workers who cannot maintain physical distance from others at their place of employment, who work in close contact with many people, especially indoors, including but not limited to restaurant cooks, dishwashers, servers, and other workers in restaurant settings; and food pantry/assistance workers.

    • Frontline essential workers in manufacturing: The intent of this classification is to prioritize workers in manufacturing settings who cannot maintain physical distance from others at their place of employment and workers who work in close contact with many people, especially indoors and in places with poor ventilation.

    • Frontline essential workers for the US postal service: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current workers who work for the US postal service in positions where they cannot maintain physical distance at work and work in close contact with many people, especially indoors. This includes post office clerks and mail sorters.

    • Frontline essential workers in public transit and specialized transportation: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current workers in public transit and who have specialized transportation staff who cannot maintain physical distance from others at their place of employment, workers who work in close contact with many people especially indoors including but not limited to bus drivers, specialized transportation staff who work in our tunnels, specialized transportation staff such as air traffic controllers, train conductors, pilots, and airline stewards.

    • Frontline essential workers in public health: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current workers in governmental public health agencies with public facing duties and heightened risk of exposure. This includes public health and environment staff, including inspectors, engaged in direct public health service delivery.

    • Frontline essential human service workers: The intent of this classification is to prioritize current workers who cannot maintain physical distance at their place of employment in the course of their work, such as those who work in close contact with other people, especially indoors. This includes but is not limited to social workers, community health workers, those who work in client homes, in community locations, and at human services work locations, and others who provide direct or in-person services to elderly and disabled populations, at domestic violence advocacy organizations, or in-person resource providers.

    • Faith leaders: The intent of this classification is to prioritize those who in the course of leading faith services cannot easily maintain physical distance and must come into close contact with other people indoors. This includes current faith leaders who must enter hospitals or other care facilities to perform last rites, who officiate life rites such as weddings and baptisms, and who lead worship services.

    • Frontline essential direct care providers for Coloradans experiencing homelessness: The intent of this classification is to prioritize workers who work in close contact with many other people, especially indoors, including but not limited to those who work and provide direct services in shelters for people experiencing homelessness.

    • Frontline essential journalists: The intent of this classification is to prioritize journalists who in the course of their work cannot easily maintain physical distance and come into contact with the public in the course of their work while conducting interviews or covering live events, especially indoors.

  • Continuity of local government: The intent of this classification is to ensure the continuity of county, municipal and other local governments. It includes select executives of those governments and a limited amount of essential support staff needed to provide for continuity of government, including members of the judicial branch who regularly come into contact with the public (e.g. state and county court trial judges, court administrators, public defenders and probation staff.)

  • Continuation of operations for state government: The intent of this classification is to ensure the continuity of essential state government services. It includes select staff needed to deliver essential services to the people of Colorado , as identified in the agencies’ continuity of operations plans.

  • People age 16 to 49 with one of the following higher risk conditions: The intent of this classification is to vaccinate Coloradans who have risk of severe outcomes from COVID-19.  It includes Coloradans with one condition listed in 1B.3 or

    • asthma (moderate-to-severe), Cerebrovascular disease (affects blood vessels and blood supply to the brain),
    • Cystic fibrosis, Hypertension or high blood pressure,
    • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from blood or bone marrow transplant, immune deficiencies, HIV, use of corticosteroids, or use of other immune weakening medicines, Neurologic conditions, such as dementia, Liver disease, Pulmonary fibrosis (having damaged or scarred lung tissues), Thalassemia (a type of blood disorder). 
  • Adults who received a placebo during a COVID-19 vaccine clinical trial.

Phase 2 - Spring

current

General public - ages 16+:

  • The intent of this classification is to vaccinate any Coloradans who were not included in earlier phases because they have lower risk of exposure or are less likely to have severe outcomes from COVID-19. May be further segmented by age if needed. Please note that the only vaccine approved for 16-17 year olds is the Pfizer vaccine. Not all vaccine providers have this vaccine available. 

More information about the state's vaccine distribution plan can be found on the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's website.

Things to Know about the COVID-19 Vaccine

  1. Vaccine appointments are open to the general public ages 16 and older.
    • The supply of COVID-19 vaccines will increase in the coming weeks and months.
    • 16-17 year olds are only able to get the Pfizer vaccine at this time. 
  2. COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective.
    • Vaccines are rigorously studied to ensure that all vaccines are as safe as possible before being approved and are continuously studied afterward.
    • Once someone is fully vaccinated, COVID-19 vaccines are 95% effective in preventing infection with the virus.
  3. You won't be protected right away.
    • The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines require 2 doses spaced about a month apart to get full protection.
      • It takes about 1-2 weeks for the vaccine to create immunity in the body once someone gets the last dose of the vaccine.
    • The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is a one-dose vaccine and it takes 1-2 weeks for the vaccine to create immunity after getting the shot.
  4. COVID vaccines are free.
    • The cost to you for the vaccine is free.

Vaccines can save lives, but so can you. 

Stopping a pandemic requires using all the tools available to us. To slow the spread of disease, Coloradans should continue to use basic public health guidance, like physical distancing and mask-wearing, until a vaccine is widely available and used by Coloradans.

Learn the most effective ways to prevent COVID-19 and stay healthy.

FAQs

  1. Larimer County coordinates with local organizations to ensure resources are available to assist with public health volunteer needs. You can also register as a volunteer with these Colorado organizations. 

    • Medical and health professions: The Colorado Volunteer Mobilizer is currently working to recruit and train individuals from the following areas: Physicians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Respiratory Therapists, EMT/Paramedics, Behavioral/Mental Health and Veterinary/animal response to name a few, to respond to "all-hazards" incidents.
    • Non-medical volunteers: Please sign up with Volunteers of America Colorado to be contacted to volunteer at community vaccination sites in Larimer County. 
    • Non-medical volunteers can sign up here with the Larimer County Health Department to be contacted if volunteers are needed for other COVID-19 response activities in Larimer County.
    • Register to volunteer to help in Colorado through the Colorado Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management, Department of Public Safety. 
  2. To replace your COVID vaccine card, contact the provider you went to for your vaccine first.

    To replace your vaccine card, we will need to verify your immunization record in our record system or in the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS). If you were vaccinated by the health department or at the State Community Vaccination Site at The Ranch, please complete this form to request a new card. 

    If you were vaccinated by another healthcare provider in Colorado, you may complete the replacement card request formWe are not able to verify records for immunizations provided outside of Colorado.

    • The FDA requires that vaccines undergo a rigorous scientific process, including three phases of clinical trials, before they authorize or approve a vaccine. The COVID-19 vaccines are subject to the same safety standards as other vaccine trials. 

    • To date, the independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board overseeing Phase 3 trials of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines has not identified or reported any serious safety concerns. All phase 3 studies have Data Safety and Monitoring Boards. The boards are made up of independent scientists hired by the company to look at the safety data and check at regular intervals whether the company should cancel or continue with the study.  

    • Additionally, two independent advisory committees will review a vaccine’s safety data before it is made available to the public. These committees are the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC), which advises the FDA, and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), which advises the CDC. 

    • Learn more about the Vaccine safety and development process.

  3. You will not be immediately protected from COVID-19 after receiving the vaccine. Studies show that it takes about one to two weeks after your last dose for your body to be able to protect itself against illness.

    Current information suggests it is possible that someone who has been vaccinated against COVID-19 may still have a mild or asymptomatic infection or spread the virus to others. So it is important to continue taking precautions. Continue wearing masks and practicing physical distancing until it is clear that it is safe to stop.

    While no vaccine is 100% effective, the Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Jonhson vaccines are highly effective for preventing severe COVID-19 illness, hospitalization, and death. 

  4. Employers may be able to require COVID-19 vaccination for in-person work for their employees, but an employee may be entitled to an exemption through the ADA and Civil Rights Act of 1964. The state of Colorado is not currently pursuing any mandates. The U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission has more information on this on their website.

  5. Feeling a little under the weather in the day or two after getting a vaccine is quite normal. Pain at the site the shot was given is common. 
    It's common to have flu-like symptoms like muscle aches, fatigue, chills, and fever after the injection. It's more common to have these symptoms after the second shot, but they can still happen after the first. These symptoms can be managed by resting, drinking lots of fluids, and taking over-the-counter medications like tylenol or ibuprofen unless your doctor has told you in the past not to take these types of medications. If the symptoms don't go away after 1-2 days, or if you have any concerns about their duration or severity, we recommend that you reach out to your physician for further guidance.

    Severe reactions are rare. If you believe you are having a serious reaction the a vaccine, please contact your healthcare provider for advice. If you would like to report an adverse (bad) reaction to a vaccine, you can do so through the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). VAERS is an early-warning system that collects and analyzes reports of any problems that happen after vaccination. Anyone can submit a report, including parents, patients, and health care professionals.

    • The initial supply of COVID-19 vaccine(s) was very limited. This means that a vaccine was not immediately available to everyone who wanted one. 
    • To be as fair and efficient with distribution as possible, the state developed a phased approach to vaccine distribution to save lives and end the crisis that has been brought on by the pandemic as quickly as possible. The phased allocation plan prioritized people at high risk of getting exposed to COVID-19, people who work in essential or critical jobs, and people who are at high risk for getting very sick or dying of COVID-19.
    • The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment recognizes the Tribal sovereignty of the Ute Mountain Ute and Southern Ute Indian Tribes, and that the Tribes have the authority to determine how vaccine supply will be prioritized for their populations, even if their prioritization scheme is different than what the department recommends.
  6. Yes. For additional FAQs, please visit the Colorado Health Department website.

  7. On Friday 4/23, The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and the Colorado Joint Vaccine Task Force alerted providers that they can proceed with using the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 vaccine immediately. The pause of this particular vaccine highlights the FDA and CDC commitment to vaccine safety.

    • Serious side effects (also known as adverse events) are extremely rare. The federal government takes all reports of vaccine adverse events seriously. 

    • CDC and FDA reviewed data involving six reported U.S. cases of a rare and severe type of blood clot in people who received the Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) vaccine. They found that this vaccine may be associated with an increased risk of very rare but potentially severe blood clots, now called thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome or TTS, particularly among women under the age of 50. Approximately seven cases of TTS per 1,000,000 vaccine doses have been identified in women under 50 to date.

      • The FDA and CDC have confidence that the Janssen vaccine is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19.

      • CDPHE has sent information to health care providers to inform them about how to identify and treat TTS in the very rare case it were to occur. The FDA and CDC have confidence that this vaccine is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19.

      • The FDA has determined that the available data show that the vaccine’s known and potential benefits outweigh its known and potential risks in individuals 18 years of age and older.

      • At this time, the available data suggest that the chance of TTS occurring is very low, but the FDA and CDC will remain vigilant in continuing to investigate this risk.

      • Health care providers administering the vaccine and vaccine recipients or caregivers should review the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Fact Sheet for Healthcare Providers Administering Vaccine (Vaccination Providers) and Fact Sheet for Recipients and Caregivers, which have been revised to include information about the risk of this syndrome, which has occurred in a very small number of people who have received the Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine.

      • People who have received the Janssen vaccine who develop severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath within three weeks after vaccination should contact their health care provider.

    There are many benefits of the one-dose vaccine:

    • Only requires one dose for protection, which means  "fully vaccinated" status in just two weeks.
    • Eliminates need to quarantine if exposed once 14 days past shot (this is true of all COVID-19 vaccines)
    • 2 dose vaccines, while very effective, take up to 6 weeks for complete vaccination
    • Getting back to normal sooner
    • Protecting those around you sooner

    Reactions to vaccines typically happen in the 15-30 minutes after getting the shot, this is why medical staff observe patients before they can leave the vaccine site. We understand that there are people (around 120k in Colorado) that have received the J&J vaccine and might have concerns.