Wildfire Emergency Alerts & Updates

For more info on Cameron Peak Fire call 970-980-2500 between 8 am - 8 pm. Or visit larimer.org/cpf . 
Cameron Peak Fire text updates: text the keyword LCEVAC to 888777  
Sign up for emergency alerts at NOCOALERT.org

 

 

Local 2-1-1 resource guide (updated 8/23/2020):

2-1-1 Colorado website

 

American Red Cross Assistance for Cameron Peak Fire

Red Cross Disaster Response Info for Cameron Peak Fire

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We expect the Cameron Peak Fire to continue burning for several more weeks.

If you evacuated your home and are in need of sheltering help, please call 1-800-RED-CROSS. Your situation will then be evaluated to determine the best course of action to address your current needs.

 

Returning Home & Recovering after a Wildfire
  • Do not enter your home until fire officials say it is safe.
  • Use caution when entering burned areas as hazards may still exist, including hot spots, which can flare up without warning.
  • Avoid damaged or fallen power lines, poles and downed wires.
  • Watch for ash pits and mark them for safety—warn family and neighbors to keep clear of the pits also.
  • Watch animals closely and keep them under your direct control. Hidden embers and hot spots could burn your pets’ paws or hooves.
  • Follow public health guidance on safe cleanup of fire ash and safe use of masks.
  • Wet debris down to minimize breathing dust particles.
  • Wear leather gloves and heavy soled shoes to protect hands and feet.
  • If there is no power, check to make sure the main breaker is on. Fires may cause breakers to trip. If the breakers are on and power is still not present, contact the utility company.
  • Inspect the roof immediately and extinguish any sparks or embers. Wildfires may have left burning embers that could reignite
  • Recheck for smoke and sparks throughout the home, including the attic. The winds of wildfires can blow burning embers anywhere. Keep checking your home for embers that could cause fires.
  • Cleaning products, paint, batteries and damaged fuel containers need to be disposed of properly to avoid risk.

It is ok to be anxious and scared right now due to the current threat of wildfire. Those feelings are normal and you are not alone. If you need someone to talk to, please reach out!

  • Summitstone Connections hotline: 970-221-5551
  • Colorado Help Line: 303-928-8534
  • Disaster Distress Helpline: 1-800-985-5990
  • Text talkwithus to 66746 to reach the Disaster Distress Helpline

Who is most at risk for emotional distress following a wildfire?

  • Children and teens. After a wildfire, young people may worry that another one will happen again, especially if they witnessed the fire and the loss of their home. Some children may become withdrawn, while others may become agitated and irritable and display outbursts of anger.
     
  • Older adults. Older adults are more likely to need social support to reduce the effects of stress and move forward on the path of recovery. They also may have limited physical mobility and lack independence.
     
  • First responders and recovery workers. These individuals may experience prolonged separation from loved ones (depending on the severity of the wildfire) and show signs of mental fatigue.

Online resources:

Ensure your food and water are safe
  • Discard any food that has been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.
  • Do NOT ever use water that you think may be contaminated to wash dishes, brush teeth, prepare food, wash hands, make ice or make baby formula.

Online Resources:

Food Safety

Power outage:

Water Safety

Animals

Safe Handling of Ash & Debris

 

Inspecting your home
  • If there is no power, check to make sure the main breaker is on. Fires may cause breakers to trip. If the breakers are on and power is still not present, contact the utility company.
  • Inspect the roof immediately and extinguish any sparks or embers. Wildfires may have left burning embers that could reignite.
  • For several hours afterward, recheck for smoke and sparks throughout the home, including the attic. The winds of wildfires can blow burning embers anywhere. Keep checking your home for embers that could cause fires.
  • Take precautions while cleaning your property. You may be exposed to potential health risks from hazardous materials.
  • Debris should be wetted down to minimize health impacts from breathing dust particles.
  • Use a two-strap dust particulate mask with nose clip and coveralls for the best minimal protection.
  • Wear leather gloves to protect hands from sharp objects while removing debris. 
  • Wear rubber gloves when working with outhouse remnants, plumbing fixtures, and sewer piping. They can contain high levels of bacteria.
  • Hazardous materials such as kitchen and bathroom cleaning products, paint, batteries, contaminated fuel, and damaged fuel containers need to be properly handled to avoid risk. Check with local authorities for hazardous disposal assistance.
  • If you have a propane tank system, contact a propane supplier. Turn off valves on the system, and leave valves closed until the supplier inspects your system.
  • If you have a heating oil tank system, contact a heating oil supplier for an inspection of your system before using.
  • Visually check the stability of the trees. Any tree that has been weakened by fire may be a hazard.
  • Look for burns on the tree trunk. If the bark on the trunk has been burned off or scorched by very high temperatures completely around the circumference, the tree will not survive and should be considered unstable.
  • Look for burnt roots by probing the ground with a rod around the base of the tree and several feet away from the base. If the roots have been burned, you should consider this tree very unstable.
  • A scorched tree is one that has lost part or all of its leaves or needles. Healthy deciduous trees are resilient and may produce new branches and leaves as well as sprouts at the base of the tree. Evergreen trees may survive when partially scorched but are at risk for bark beetle attacks
 

Disposal Forms & Landfill Info:

The Larimer County Landfill will only accept fire debris from November 16, 2020, through April 16, 2021.  ALL FIRE DEBRIS MUST BE HANDLED AS IF IT CONTAINS FRIABLE ASBESTOS.

Other Online Resources:
Mail delivery curtailed in some areas due to Cameron Peak Fire: Customers can pick up mail at nearby Post Offices until delivery resumes
  • Dangers from the Cameron Peak Wildfire have forced curtailment of mail delivery to Drake, Glen Haven and Masonville, CO Post Offices.
  • Masonville customers can pick up their mail at the Loveland Main Post Office, 446 E. 29th St. Loveland, CO 80538 during regular business hours, M-F 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • Glen Haven and Drake customers can pick up their mail at the Estes Park Post Office, 215 W. Riverside Dr, Estes Park 80517 during regular business hours, M-F 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
  • A photo ID is required to pick up mail.

Election Ballots: If you have concerns about receiving your election ballot, please contact the Larimer County Clerk & Recorder.
 

Online Resources:

We know you all want to do your part to help first responders and those impacted by the 2020 wildfires.  We are all lucky to live in such a generous and engaged community!

Donations:

  • Donate to the Cameron Peak Fire Response Fund through the United Way of Larimer County, impact.uwaylc.org/CameronPeakFire. All donations are tax-deductible and will be distributed to people affected by the Cameron Peak Fire.
     
  • The Ranch is taking donations of grass hay and no other supplies at this time. Please call Maggie Steely at 970-619-4009 to first to donate hay.
     
  • Please consider donating to the American Red Cross of Northern Colorado.  The Red Cross is spending thousands of dollars daily to shelter residents of Larimer County safely.
     
  • Larimer County Humane Society has sheltered hundreds of companion and small animals throughout the course of the Cameron Peak Fire and continue to do so today.  Please consider donating to them at https://register.larimerhumane.org/give/234539/#!/donation/checkout
     
  • Disaster response would be impossible without the help of our local Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD). By donating to any of these organizations, you contribute to disaster response and recovery in northern Colorado. 
     
  • Important note: responding agencies are not accepting physical donations right now.  This includes food, clothing and other items.  Our first responders have specific dietary needs while working on the front line and food donations cannot be used. We ask that residents do not support drives for any physical items at this time.  We appreciate the good intentions, but unsolicited donations create additional logistical support, which is not readily available.

Volunteers: 

  • Sign up for future Cameron Peak Fire recovery volunteer projects at www.nocovolunteers.org. Opportunities will be posted once projects are created. 
     
  • To volunteer to care for large animals evacuated to The Ranch, please call Carol Waller at 970-619-4019. All volunteers must be over 18. 

 

 

Library Resources

The Larimer County Libraries (Estes, Red Feather, Ft. Collins, Berthoud and Loveland) are ready and willing to provide access to technology, books, DVDs, craft kits as well as their buildings to support those displaced by the fires. They are able to take resources to evacuees sheltering in hotels.  The library buildings are open and residents impacted by the fire are welcome to come in to use the computers, check out materials, take activity kits or just hang out with their kids.