Index: Health / Subcategory: Physical Health

Cancer Incidence & Mortality

Date Updated: 10/02/2012

Cancer develops when cells in a part of the body begin to grow out of control. Cancer cells develop because of damage to DNA (a substance present in every cell that directs all activities) and once formed, these cells may travel to other parts of the body and replace normal tissue (a process called metastasis). The sooner a cancer is found, the better the odds for survival. The risk for developing most types of cancer may be reduced through lifestyle changes (such as quitting smoking and improved diet). For more information on cancer and resources see the American Cancer Society website.

The following data were obtained from the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's Colorado Health Information Database (CoHID). CDPHE protects patient confidentiality by limiting access to data when identification is statistically possible. Therefore, in certain circumstances (such as for Racial & Ethnic Health Data), data for Larimer County were suppressed and unavailable for analysis. Rates used in this report were age-adjusted per 100,000 residents. In 2002, the standard comparison group for age-adjusted cancer incidence rates was updated. It is recommended that data from 2002 and later not be compared with data before 2002. Additionally, in 1999, the standard comparison group for age-adjusted mortality rates was also updated. CoHID states this change may affect trends in mortality.

Definitions:

Incidence - the number of new diagnoses within a population

Mortality - the number or rate of deaths that occur in a population

Age-adjusted rates - the rate that would occur if populations had age distributions equal to a standard population

What this chart shows: Cancer Incidence Rate (per 100,000) in Colorado & Larimer County, 2000-2009

*Age-Adjusted Rate

Data Source: Colorado Health Information Dataset - Cancer Incidence Statistics

See data table

What the above data tell us:

In Larimer County, the rate of new cancer cases (incidence) was higher than that of Colorado for five of the six years shown above. The increases in Larimer County may have been due to higher rates of breast, colorectal and urinary bladder cancers. For more information, see the chart/ table of Increasing Cancer Incidence Rates (per 100,000) in Larimer County, 2004-2009.

What this chart shows: Cancer Mortality Rate (per 100,000) in Colorado & Larimer County, 2002-2011

*Age-Adjusted Rate

Data Source: Colorado Health Information Dataset - Death Statistics

See data table

What the above data tell us:

From 2002 to 2011, cancer mortality rates for Colorado and Larimer County generally declined. Larimer County first met the Healthy People 2010 objective (159.9 per 100,000) in 2003 and has remained within these guidelines since. Colorado reached this level in 2004 and the downward trend has continued.

The decline in mortality rates is most likely reflective of a national trend showing decreases in lung, prostate, and colon cancer in men, and breast and colorectal cancer in women. The decline in death rate is important because this is the best indicator of progress against cancer. The American Cancer Society attributed national decreases to reduced exposure to tobacco, earlier detection through screening, and more effective treatment.

What this chart shows: Site-Specific Cancer Incidence Rate (per 100,000) in Colorado by Race/Ethnicity, 2009

Rates for Native Americans were unavailable or suppressed to protect patient confidentiality.

*Age-Adjusted Rate

Data Source: Colorado Health Information Dataset - Cancer Incidence Statistics

See data table

What the above data tell us:

Colorado figures were used in the above chart because Larimer County race and ethnicity data are not available due to the small sample size. In 2009, African-Americans had the highest incidence rates of prostate and lung cancers in Colorado. Additionally, Hispanics had the highest rates of colorectal, cervical, and liver cancers, whereas Whites had the highest rates of breast cancer.

See Total Cancer Deaths by Race/Ethnicity in Colorado (2002-2011) for a breakdown of cancer deaths in Colorado by race/ethnicity.

What this chart shows: Increasing Cancer Incidence Rates by Type in Larimer County, 2004-2009

*Age-Adjusted Rate

Data Source: Colorado Health Information Dataset - Cancer Incidence Statistics

Return to text

Additional Information:

Total Cancer Deaths by Race/ Ethnicity in Colorado

 

White

African-American

Asian American & Pacific Islander

American Indian & Alaskan Native

Hispanic

2002

6,063 205 77 26 545

2003

6,079 214 81 23 603

2004

5,878 190 92 25 579

2005

6,004 228 103 29 574

2006

6,164 224 97 31 606

2007

6,240 243 72 29 576

2008

6,366 228 73 40 673

2009

6,537 242 108 40 696

2010

6,584 280 110 39 673

2011

6,605 250 118 41 659

Data Source: Colorado Health Information Dataset - Death Statistics

Healthy People 2010 was a national health promotion and disease prevention initiative establishing national objectives to improve the health of all Americans, to eliminate disparities, and to increase the years and quality of life.

New guidelines and objectives have been established for the next ten years, through 2020.

Related Information on COMPASS -

Other Resources -

Industry Standards or Targets:

Healthy People 2010:

Healthy People 2020:

Data Tables:

Cancer Incidence Rates (per 100,000) in Colorado & Larimer County, Age-Adjusted Rate

Colorado

Larimer County

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

2000

16,771

453.1

984

464.0

2001

17,789

468.3

1,059

485.7

2002

17,934

460.3

1,073

471.7

2003

18,032

449.9

1,097

473.1

2004

18,296

442.8

1,074

445.7

2005

18,836

443.0

1,131

452.2

2006

19,179

438.7

1,133

438.0

2007

20,179

448.5

1,168

432.4

2008

20,446

438.8

1,253

443.9

2009

21,136

435.9

1,173

399.2

See chart

Cancer Mortality Rates (per 100,000) in Colorado & Larimer County, Age-Adjusted Rate

Colorado

Larimer County

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

2002

6,372

173.2

355

168.8

2003

6,400

168.7

352

157.0

2004

6,185

158.7

331

143.1

2005

6,367

158.9

359

145.7

2006

6,523

158.7

393

158.0

2007

6,590

156.0

386

146.2

2008

6,709

152.6

372

132.9

2009

6,938

152.3

404

140.7

2010

7,029

148.2

412

138.9

2011

7,037

143.6

413

131.8

See chart

Site-Specific Cancer Incidence Rate (per 100,000) by Race/Ethnicity* -
Colorado (2009), Age-Adjusted Rate

White

Hispanic

African-American

Asian-American/ Pacific Islander

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Number

Rate

Breast

2,917

71.5

354

62.4

109

62.6

57

41.9

Cervix

104

2.7

36

5.1

4

1.7

4 2.9

Prostate

2,715

65.0

273

54.8

170

98.0

24 21.1

Colon & Rectum

1,346

34.8

242

49.9

67

38.7

43 37.9

Lung & Bronchus

1,929

50.6

184

41.6

80

51.5

40 37.6

Stomach

190

4.8

61

13.2

13

7.8

16 17.0

Liver & Intrahepatic Bile Duct

225

5.6

93

18.7

22

12.0

18 14.7

* Colorado Native American figures were either unavailable or suppressed to protect confidentiality.

See chart